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Cesarean Risks: Adhesions

This is a comprehensive article on adhesions which is a fancy word for scar tissue.  I think the most relevant points of this whole discussion are:

  1. Adhesions “develop in 93% of people who have undergone pelvic surgery” and “they are especially common after cesarean sections.”
  2. You get more adhesions with each cesarean.
  3. Adhesions can cause:
    • Pelvic or Abdominal Pain
    • Bowel Obstruction
    • Infertility
  4. Adhesions impact future cesareans by making the surgery longer which can put your baby at risk in an emergency situation (emphasis mine):
    • “If you have had a cesarean section and are pregnant or planning to have another child, these adhesions could complicate matters. If you are having another c-section, your health care provider will have to separate and cut through all of your adhesions before she can begin the c-section. For women who have had more than three cesareans, this could take ten minutes to an hour or more. In an emergency, this could place your baby at risk.
  5. Adhesions “shouldn’t pose a problem” for VBAC:
    • “If you elect to have a vaginal birth after a cesarean , or VBAC, adhesions shouldn’t pose much of a problem, unless you have had multiple cesarean sections. Typically, women who have only had one cesarean section can deliver vaginally without any difficulties. There is a chance that the scar tissue covering the incision in your uterus could rupture. This can be very dangerous, as it can cause massive bleeding or cut off your baby’s oxygen supply. However, the risk of uterine rupture during a VBAC is very low, typically occurring in less than 1 out of every 1,000 births.”

To read the whole article, go here: C-Sections and Adhesions

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