Neonatal nurse has a homebirth VBAC

This is a great birth story, published with permission, of a woman who had a cesarean for “small pelvis” and then VBACed a larger baby at home!  Since she is a neonatal nurse, it’s interesting to read why she chose HBAC and how she thinks her birth would have gone differently had she labored in a hospital.

I just wanted to let everyone know that I gave birth to a healthy baby girl Wednesday June 11th. I had a C/S with my son 2 years ago.

He was 8lbs 2oz and I was told that my pelvis wasn’t big enough to birth an 8lb baby. Well my VBAC baby was 9lbs 2 oz. Exactly a pound bigger than they told me. I knew I wasn’t broken.

I chose to have a homebirth  because I felt I would always have to fight for what I wanted in the
hospital. My labor went great. Started around 3am contractions coming 10 minutes apart. Then progressed to 3-5 min apart at around 6:30am.

My midwife got there around 7:30am. Later I wanted to go into the birthing tub to try to get through the contractions. My midwife wanted to check to see how far I was. 4cm and 100% effaced. She told me to try to hold off on the tub because it would be better when I am
further in labor. I then took a hot shower.

For me the contractions were more bearable standing up. When one would come on I would bend my knees and lean over onto either the couch, my bed or my husband. The worse position for me to labor on was my back and my side.

After the shower I asked if I could go into the tub again. She checked me and I was 6cm with a bulging bag. I did go into the tub which for me didn’t make much difference in the contractions. But at that point I stayed in there for quite a while because it took too much energy for me to

For me the worse part was going from 6 cm to complete. I thought it would have been the pushing part but it wasn’t. In the tub I did feel like pushing a little bit. We couldn’t tell if my water had broken since I was in the tub. I decided to get checked in the tub to see if the water had indeed broken and plus since I was feeling “pushy.” Still at 6cm but the bag was bulging more.

They think that was why I was feeling like I had to push. They let me push a couple of pushes to see if that would break my water but it didn’t. Then they told me not to push and just try to breath through the contractions. My water still wasn’t breaking and it was the hardest thing trying not to push when that overwhelming feeling was there. They gave me the option of breaking my water and felt that once they did that the baby’s head would apply to the cervix and help with dilation. I agreed. They broke the water and sure enough baby’s head came right
down and I was 8-9cm.

The pushing feeling let up and I labored more for a while. I then started feeling pushy again and they decided to check to make sure I was fully dilated before I fully pushed. I just had an anterior lip. Again they told me not to push so that the anterior lip would pull back over the baby’s head and not swell. I was dying to push but breathed through each contraction for an hour or two. (I lost all sense of time so I don’t know exactly how long it was.)

The best position for me was on my hands and knees but they said that with the anterior lip that the position was actually making it worse. They wanted me to lie on my back to help take pressure off the cervix to facilitate it moving around the baby’s head.

Lying on my back was so unbearable but I did it to help with the dilation. The midwife decided to try to help push the cervix over the head. She told me to push while she held it out of the way. Finally her head came down and I could fully push to my heart’s desire. That felt great.

They asked if I wanted to go back to the hands and knees position since the cervix isn’t an issue now but I said I just could not bear to move to another position. Then the “ring of fire came” Boy did that burn.

Finally her head came out and, surprise, so did a hand. They said that her hand was across her face. They pulled the hand out along with the head and since one shoulder was in and one was out she was having a little bit of trouble maneuvering.

They wanted me to flip to my hands and knees to open up the pelvis more. I thought they were crazy. Me trying to flip over with a head hanging out. I knew that I just had to do it as quickly as I could or it wouldn’t have gotten done. My husband said he had never seen me move so quickly in my life. I pushed a little more and she was out!

Amazingly I had no tears. Personally I thought that was pretty amazing to have my first full term vaginal birth of 9lbs 2oz with no tears what-so-ever!

So to all of those women who have been told that you would have died in childbirth because you couldn’t push out your own baby YOU CAN! I am proof that I delivered a baby 1 pound bigger than what they said.

I am a nurse who works in labor & delivery so I see all of the unnecessary interventions that they do.

I was pondering about my birth. If I would have chosen a hospital birth I probably would have ended up with another c/s or an episiotomy. There were times during my birth where I thought, “Am I crazy? I can’t deal with this pain!” The midwives and doula helped me through the intense contractions.

If I was at the hospital they would have bullied me into an epidural and therefore I wouldn’t have been able to move around to get her to come down. Also I wouldn’t have been able to feeling the progression of her head coming down when I pushed.

With my son I pushed and couldn’t really feel any progress so mentally I was losing hope. With this birth it didn’t feel like I pushed for an hour because I could feel the accomplishment of her
coming down. I see this happen all of the time at the hospital.

If a mom isn’t pushing quick enough for the doctor or they think the head is too big then they will automatically do an episiotomy. They probably would have done that and it just shows that it would have been for nothing and I would have had a longer recovery time.

So therefore I am grateful that I found homebirth and such wonderful midwives. I hope this inspires all of you who are having the normal feelings of “what if I can’t do it.” Good luck
to your future births, You CAN do it!

15 thoughts on “Neonatal nurse has a homebirth VBAC

  1. Jessica

    I am pregnant with #2 about 32weeks along. I had a c-section with my first due to “High risk” he had gastroschisis and the doctors told me it would put him at risk for having bowel abstructions if we tried to have the birth go naturally. So far with this baby my pregnancy has felt great! I have no “high risk” with this one, but I am very worried that I will not make the right choice as to have a vbac or another c-section. I still have not decided. Does the way you were “cut” during your c-section have anything to weigh the risks? Or how long in between children matter? My first was 5 years ago and wondering if this factors a more positive outcome on vbacs? So many questions and my doctors response isnt very reassuring, I have looked into second opinions but get so many different responses. We plan on having at least one or two more babies by the time I am 30, so in about 4yrs we plan on 2 more 🙂 Thank you for your story as it has really made me want to try a vbac, granted everything goes as planned I am now leaning towards this choice. Thanks again!!

    1. Jen Kamel Post author


      Yes, what type of incision you have determines whether you are a VBAC candidate per ACOG. Their latest recommendations state,

      The preponderance of evidence suggests that most women with one previous cesarean delivery with a low transverse incision are candidates for and should be counseled about VBAC and offered TOLAC [trial of labor after cesarean]. Conversely, those at high risk for complications (eg, those with previous classical or T-incision, prior uterine rupture, or extensive transfundal uterine surgery) and those in whom vaginal delivery is otherwise contraindicated are not generally candidates for planned TOLAC.

      They also state that having an unknown or low vertical scar should not prevent a woman from planning a VBAC. I recommend getting a copy of your medical records to confirm the type of incision you have on your uterus.

      You can read about birth intervals here. If you want more information, you can review the information I share here.

      With your intentions of having at least four kids, VBAC would certainly be a safer option for you provided that you are a candidate for vaginal birth. The risks of cesareans increase with each surgery and make each subsequent pregnancy riskier regardless of if you plan a VBAC or a repeat cesarean.

      Finding a VBAC supportive care provider is the #1 thing you can do to have a successful VBAC. Once you get a copy of your medical records & operative report from your cesarean, get the names of VBAC supportive providers, and ask the right questions. Read more about planning a VBAC.

      Best of luck!



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