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Birth Plan Radio Show Notes

I was recently interview by Roanna Rosewood of Birth Plan Radio.  You can listen to the show here.  Below you will find links where you can read more about the various topics discussed.

Show Notes

The history of VBAC bans, Jen’s cesarean and then VBAC.

Jen’s unique form of advocacy.

ACOG’s 2010 VBAC recommendations

The various documents related to the 2010 National Institutes of Health VBAC Conference

Birth myths, specifically on inducing VBACs, how the risk of uterine rupture differs between women who have had a cesarean and those who haven’t, and how the risk of rupture compares between induced, unscarred moms and scarred moms.

How the risk of rupture compares to lightning strikes, fatal car accidents, and why these aren’t really great ways to compare risk.

Scare tactics: a mom’s VBAC consult and this exchange with an OB.

On women being told VBAC is illegal and VBAC bans.

Why cesareans are a big deal.

Check out the Power to Push VBAC Info Booklet produced by the BC Women’s Cesarean Task Force.

Overview of the Guise 2010 Evidence Report and the actual report.

Silver 2006, the four year study of 30,000 women undergoing up to 6 cesareans.

The limited evidence on rupture-related perinatal mortality.

On confirming your scar type through obtaining a copy of your medical records and operative report.

Compiling the names of VBAC supportive providers in your area.

Questions to ask when interviewing car providers.

Read Bujold’s August 2012 article published in the North American Journal of Medical Sciences reviewing the research to date on single vs. dual layer suturing.

An excellent, though growing outdated, review of VBA2C research.

Thoughts on VBA3+C.

CDC’s article which was the source for the “49% of American pregnancies are unintended” statistic.

ACOG’s 2004 clinical guidelines on postterm pregnancy.

Mayo Clinic’s 2011 article on postterm pregnancy.

ACOG’s 2001 clinical guidelines on fetal macrosomia (“big babies”).

Shoulderdystociainfo.com

The VBAC Facts Micro Brochure.

5 hour class developed by Jen – The Truth About VBAC: History, Politics, and Stats.

Processing traumatic births.

57% of women who express an interest in VBAC say that they can’t find a supportive HCP or hospital (Declercq, 2006).

92% of women have repeat cesareans (Osterman, 2011).

Court ordered cesareans.

When to engage an attorney.

One mom’s story of a threatened forced cesarean which includes the letter written by the National Advocates of Pregnant Women, the ACLU, the ACLU’s Women’s Rights Project, and the National Birth Policy Coalition.

Action Item: Letter to the Editor

Larger newspapers in metropolitan areas want shorter letters, usually around 100 words, whereas smaller newspapers servicing suburban/rural areas generally permit around 250 words.  Pick whichever version works best for you area.

249 word version for smaller newspapers

Dear Editor,

I am concerned about [hospital’s] ban on vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC.)

This ban goes against The American College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists (ACOG) as well as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) who, in 2010, affirmed that VBAC is a safe and reasonable option for most women while urging that barriers to VBAC be eliminated.

VBAC bans directly conflict with ACOG’s guidelines which state “the ultimate decision to undergo [a trial of labor after cesarean] or a repeat cesarean delivery should be made by the patient in consultation with her health care provider.”

Furthermore, ACOG argues that restrictive VBAC policies and bans should not be used to force women to undergo a repeat cesarean delivery even if a hospital does not offer 24/7 anesthesia.

I urge hospital administrators to watch Dr. David Birnbach’s presentation from the 2010 NIH VBAC Conference detailing the various strategies motivated hospitals employ to safely offer VBAC in the absence of 24/7 anesthesia: http://vimeo.com/10808838.  In the public comments section, look for the OB whose rural hospital has a 30% VBAC rate and great outcomes, without providing 24/7 anesthesia.

Fundamentally, every hospital should be able to treat obstetrical complications whether they are from moms planning VBACs, repeat cesareans, or first time moms.

Since half of American women are interested in VBAC, most women are candidates, most are successful, and it is their human right to make to make healthcare decisions for themselves and their babies, I urge [hospital] to reverse its VBAC ban.  Learn more at vbacfacts.com.

Sincerely,

[signed]

102 word version for larger newspapers

Dear Editor,

I am concerned about [hospital’s] ban on vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC.)

This ban goes against The American College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists as well as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) who, in 2010, affirmed that VBAC is a safe and reasonable option for most women.

A NIH VBAC Conference presentation detailed strategies on offering VBAC in the absence of 24/7 anesthesia: http://vimeo.com/10808838.

Since half of American women are interested in VBAC, most women are candidates, most are successful, and it is their human right to make this choice, I urge [hospital] to reverse its VBAC ban.  Learn more at vbacfacts.com.

Sincerely,

[signed]

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