Category Archives: Inductions

Q&A: Induction Protocols

pitocin package

 

Isabel recently asked over on Uterine rupture rates after 40 weeks:

“I wonder however if there are studies that compare the method of induction. My Doula said that the increase rates of uterine/ scar rupture was due to using high dosages of Pitocin, but now the induction uses lower dosages and administered at longer intervals. Do you know something about this?
Thank you”

 

Isabel,

Great question.

A few factors to consider:

1. Induction protocols can vary by provider, including some providers who don’t induced planned VBACs at all.
2. Induction guidelines can vary by hospital.
3. Women can react to the same drug/dose differently.
4. Some studies do compare the uterine rupture rates among spontaneous, induced, and augmented planned VBACs.

Medical studies on induction are only relevant to your situation if your provider follows the same protocol outlined in the study. However induction protocols are often not spelled out in detail unless that is the focus of the study.

When reading medical research, make special note of the sample size. We need ample participants in order to accurately capture and report the incidence of uncommon events such as uterine rupture. I typically like to see at least 3,000.  

Also remember that it’s ideal to have a experimental group (who receives the induction protocol) and a control group (who does not receive the induction protocol) in order to measure the difference in outcomes, such as fetal distress, uterine rupture, hemorrhage, cesarean hysterectomy, etc. Ideally, we would have a couple thousand, at least, in the experimental and control group.

In terms of the trend that induction now uses lower dosages and is administered at longer intervals, that may be true in some practices, but I would always confirm and not assume.

Anecdotally, I have heard a wide range of induction protocols reported just as research has identified similar variations among cesarean and episiotomy rates that are not linked to medical indication. This California Healthcare Foundation infographic clearly illustrates how hospitals differ:

Tale of Two Births

CLICK to share on Facebook

In terms of specific studies comparing the method of induction, the first resource that comes to mind is the Guise 2010 Evidence Report.

Search for the word Cytotec and there is a discussion comparing rates of rupture by Pitocin, prostaglandins, and Cytotec.

Pitocin is associated with the lowest rate of rupture among the chemical agents which is likely why ACOG (2010) recommends Pitocin and/or Foley catheter induction in planned VBACs when a medical indication presents. (Learn more about what the Pitocin insert actually says.)

There may be more recent studies out there. Google Scholar is a good place to start. You can often obtain the full texts of medical studies at your local library, university, or graduate school.

Also, if you subscribe to Evidence Based Birth’s newsletter, she will email you a crash course on how to find good evidence.

I hope this helps!

Jen

What is the induction protocol at your facility? Does it differ for those with a prior cesarean? Let me know in the comment section.

 

 DSC_0111 head Jennifer Kamel is the Founder & Director of VBAC Facts whose mission is to close the gap between what the best practice guidelines from ACOG and the NIH say about VBAC and repeat cesarean and what people generally believe. VBAC Facts is an advocate for accurate and fair information and does not promote a specific mode of delivery, type of health care professional, or birth location. Ms. Kamel presents her class “The Truth About VBAC: History, Politics, & Stats” throughout the United States. Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Continuing Education Provider #16238.

 

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American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (2010). Practice Bulletin No. 115: Vaginal Birth After Previous Cesarean Delivery. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 116 (2), 450-463, http://dhmh.maryland.gov/midwives/Documents/ACOG%20VBAC.pdf

California Healthcare Foundation. (2014, Nov). A Tale of Two Births: High- and Low-Performing Hospitals on Maternity Measures in California. Retrieved from California Healthcare Foundation: http://www.chcf.org/publications/2014/11/tale-two-births

Guise, J.-M., Eden, K., Emeis, C., Denman, M., Marshall, N., Fu, R., . . . McDonagh, M. (2010). Vaginal Birth After Cesarean: New Insights. Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US). Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK44571/

Friedman, A. M., Ananth, C. V., Prendergast, E., Alton, M. E., & Wright, J. D. (2015). Variation in and factors associated with use of episiotomy. JAMA, 313(2), 197-199. Retrieved from http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2089343

Kozhimannil, K. B., Arcaya, M. C., & Subramanian, S. V. (2014). Maternal Clinical Diagnoses and Hospital Variation in the Risk of Cesarean Delivery: Analyses of a National US Hospital Discharge Database. PLoS Med, 11(10). Retrieved from http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1001745

Induction is wrong, wrong, wrong… wait, what?

Strict asian girlI hear all the time how induction in VBAC is contraindicated. This is false. This is the kind of misinformation that materializes when we demonize all induction rather than specifying that elective inductions are not worth the increased risks.

It’s important to use clear, specific language when we talk about birth because there is a lot of confusion among moms, advocates, doulas, and health care providers about VBAC and induction. When I point out the lack of clarity many people have on the topic to “anti-induction advocates” (for the lack of a better term), they respond with the fact that their focus is warning moms about elective inductions, which is absolutely needed. And they genuinely believe that people are aware of the distinction between elective and medically-indicated inductions. However, that has not been my experience, in fact it’s been quite the opposite.  There are many people who don’t understand the why, when, and how of inducing VBACs and that is impacting the abilities of women to make informed decisions and exercise their right of patient autonomy.

First, you can induce VBACs

To be clear, medically indicated induction in a VBAC is not contraindicated! Yet, many, many, many people persist that it is citing ACOG (1) and the Pitocin insert (2). ACOG clearly says in their latest VBAC guidelines (3) that “induction remains an option” in a mom planning a VBAC via Pitocin or Foley catheter. The Pitocin drug insert (2) does state, “Except in unusual circumstances, oxytocin [Pitocin] should not be administered in the following conditions” and then lists “previous major surgery on the cervix or uterus including cesarean section.” However, despite conventional wisdom, a prior cesarean is not listed under the contraindications section.  Further, the drug insert recognizes the value of individualized care:

The decision [to use Pitocin in a woman with a prior cesarean] can be made only by carefully weighing the potential benefits which oxytocin can provide in a given case against rare but definite potential for the drug to produce hypertonicity or tetanic spasm.

This is in line with ACOG’s latest VBAC recommendations (3) where they say, “Respect for patient autonomy supports the concept that patients should be allowed to accept increased levels of risk…” So this is information a woman can use to make an informed decision if she is faced with a medical condition that requires sooner rather than later delivery of her baby, but not necessarily in the next 15 minutes.  To induce, have a cesarean, or wait for spontaneous labor when facing a true medical issue is a decision for the mom to make in conjunction with her supportive heath care provider based on the evidence of her risks, benefits, and options.

My point is, if you just read bits and pieces of the insert, or a few key quotes from an anti-induction article, you are going to miss the full story; much like how reading the full text of a study gives you context and details that you lack by just reading the abstract.  Read my article (4) for more information on inducing VBACs.

Yet, misinformation persists

Ok, so now you know that induction remains an option per the Pitocin insert, ACOG, and respect for patient autonomy.  Now check out these quotes, from the last couple days, from six different people. If I were to keep a list of comments like these, just referring to induction and VBAC for a month, I would literally have dozens if not hundreds.  Misinformation is rampant:

“pitocin is CONTRAINDICATED for vbac bc the risk of uterine rupture”

“I thought it was unsafe to use pitocin with a vbac.”

“vbac should never be induced!”

“It is unsafe for prev surgical births. It says so in the PDR, or at least it did.”

“Not supposed to induce with a VBAC.”

“Never never never have an induction, especially with any kind of vbac!! Oh my goodness. it drastically raises your chances of uterine rupture!! Holy toledo. If you don’t know the risks involved with inductions, especially in vbacs, don’t offer the advice! Smh. Pitocin is completely contraindicated for vbacs, I’m pretty sure it even says that on the insert.”

“Are you actually trying to argue that induction of labour on a VBAC is OK???WOW…that is not evidence based AT ALL. Every study that has been done comparing the two shows a clear rise in risk associated with induction of labour and rupture. I am ALL for choice no matter the case, but I think every women has a right to INFORMED choice and you clearly are not. UNLIKE.”

Note the tone of these comments.  There is no room for negotiation.  Do you get the sense that they are just referring to elective inductions or all inductions? The message I get from these comments is loud and clear: these individuals believe that VBACs should not be induced. Period.

“Well, I would choose an induction…”

What is especially ironic is that some women who speak this way in public, privately share with me, that they themselves would opt for an induction over a repeat cesarean. Though do you see room for that option in any of the comments above?  They preserve that choice for themselves and yet pound the party line that all induction is always wrong and publicly deny that option to other women… for what purpose?  To maintain ad nauseam that induction is an evil, evil thing? Yes, apparently that is the case.

The last person’s comment was in response to me sharing my article (4) and saying that induction with medical indication does and should remain an option for moms planing VBACs.  Her reply equates my actions of sharing this reality with advocating against informed choice. How is keeping women in the dark about their options supporting the notion of informed consent? That faulty logic deserves a capitalized “WOW” with excessive exclamation points.

This is not the first person to say something like this to me. People so staunchly (and incorrectly) maintain that VBACs should never be induced because they have been indoctrinated to believe that induction is always wrong, it always introduces more risks.

More risk than what?

But the key question is: More risk than what? That is always what women should ask.

More risk than having a fetal demise before labor, partial placental abruption, or serious uterine infection and remaining pregnant? OK, so let’s say that is the truth.

Then any time any scarred woman has any of those medical conditions as well as those listed in my article (4), and they agree that remaining pregnant has higher risks that delivering the baby, they should have a cesarean, right? Even if vaginal birth remains an option, albeit via an induced labor?  Even if baby needs to be born sooner rather than later, but not necessarily in the next 15 minutes?  Those moms shouldn’t have a choice, they shouldn’t have a say, they should just go straight to cesarean?  How is that preserving choice for women?

Don’t misrepresent the facts

That is what these (extreme) “induction is wrong” proponents don’t understand. Induction has its place, as does every other medical intervention, and if you want to go straight to cesarean, rather than having a medically-indicated induction, fine.

But don’t misrepresent the truth to other women.

Don’t misrepresent what ACOG (1) or the Pitocin insert (2) says.

Don’t misrepresent the risks of Pitocin by listing a mish-mash of complications with no rates.  (How are women to understand the risks if you don’t tell them how frequently those emergencies occur?)

Don’t say things that can be disproved with a single mouse click like inducing VBACs is against evidence based medicine.

Don’t undermine a woman’s legal right to autonomy (5) by perpetuating the myth, that all induction, including when medically indicated, is wrong, wrong, wrong.

Don’t dictate specific actions while withholding facts that would enable women to make their own decisions, even if they are different that what you would prefer.

Medically indicated induction = choice

People don’t appreciate that standing for medically indicated induction is standing for women to have a choice: induction vs. repeat cesarean. Without induction, there is no choice when a valid medical reason presents. By eliminating the option of induction, women are mandated to the increasing risks (6) of repeat cesarean. And yet people who persist in their agenda say things like this to me (naturally, the following was asserted after I shared my article (4) and they didn’t read it),

Does inducing a VBAC increase the chance of rupture??? YES. Does a women, and should a women have the right to choose that irregardless of that FACT??? YES. Is the most important thing informed consent?? I believe it is.

Clear language provides clarity

So if people think that, then they should use clear, unambiguous language like, “Induction remains an option when a medical indication presents” or “Elective induction isn’t worth the increased risks” rather than flat out declaring “pitocin is contraindicated” (false) and claiming that induction in a VBAC is not evidenced based (false) as this very commenter did earlier in the thread. If someone maintains that it should be a woman’s choice, then they should share substantiated facts, context, statistics, and references, not erroneous blanket statements.

Women can make informed decisions only when they are informed

To provide information supports choice and informed consent. To dictate a specific action while misrepresenting the evidence eliminates choice and prohibits informed consent . I do not dictate to other women what they should do (7).

If you read my article (4), you will see that I list the reasons for medically indicated induction as well as provide an extensive review of studies illustrating the increased risk of uterine rupture. I do this rather than simply saying, “the risk of rupture is higher and thus you shouldn’t do it” because providing facts with context puts the choice in the hands of the mom, rather than me (or anyone else) dictating to her what she should do.

Some women will accept that higher rate of rupture in order to have a vaginal birth. Others will choose to accept the risks of a repeat cesarean section. Those are choices for women to make for themselves based on facts, not on misrepresentations of what other women (incorrectly) think is contraindicated.

“Induction is wrong” & patient autonomy

People who advocate that “induction is always wrong” don’t understand the implications of their assertions. By arguing against inductions, which in the minds of many include medically indicated inductions since no distinction is made, they are effectively advocating for more cesareans and against informed consent and patient autonomy. The mission of VBAC Facts is to make hard-to-find, interesting, and pertinent information relative to post-cesarean birth options easily accessible to the people who seek it. I advocate for informed consent and patient autonomy and that is why I share evidence (4) rather than dictating what others should do. I only hope that this reasoning and evidence based position spreads because there are far to many people out there who persist in the inaccurate philosophy that inductions in a VBAC are always wrong even in the face of a valid medical reason. This does not support choice, women, or birth.

I profusely apologize for the excessive underlining in this article, but I think you will agree, that it was absolutely necessary.

Sources

1. Kamel, J. (2010, Jul 21). ACOG issues less restrictive VBAC guidelines. Retrieved from VBAC Facts: http://vbacfacts.com/2010/07/21/acog-issues-less-restrictive-vbac-guidelines/

2. JHP Pharmaceuticals LLC. (2012, Sept). Pitocin official FDA information, side effects and uses. Retrieved from Drugs.com: http://www.drugs.com/pro/pitocin.html

3. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (2010). Practice Bulletin No. 115: Vaginal Birth After Previous Cesarean Delivery. Obstetrics and Gynecology , 116 (2), 450-463. Retrieved from Our Bodies Our Blog: http://www.ourbodiesourblog.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/ACOG_guidelines_vbac_2010.pdf

4. Kamel, J. (2012, May 27). Myth: VBACs should never be induced. Retrieved from VBAC Facts: http://vbacfacts.com/2012/05/27/myth-vbacs-should-never-be-induced/

5. Kamel, J. (n.d.). Legal stuff. Retrieved from VBAC Facts: http://vbacfacts.com/category/vbac/legal-stuff

6. Kamel, J. (2012, Dec 9). Why cesareans are a big deal to you, your wife, and your daughter. Retrieved from VBAC Facts: http://vbacfacts.com/2012/12/09/why-cesareans-are-a-big-deal-to-you-your-wife-and-your-daughter/

7. Kamel, J. (2012, Dec 7). Some people think I’m anti-this/ pro-that: My advocacy style. Retrieved from VBAC Facts: http://vbacfacts.com/2012/12/07/some-people-think-im-anti-thispro-that-my-advocacy-style/

 

Fact or Myth

Myth: Induced unscarred mom as likely as VBAC mom to rupture

Fact or MythUpdate 1/20/12 – Someone who believed this birth myth to be true, told me that the source of this information was an OB from St. Louis who presented at the 2011 ICAN conference. I contacted ICAN and they said that the person must be referring to Dr. George Macones. Yet, no one on the ICAN Board, who were seated at the front table during his presentation, remembers him saying that induced, unscarred women have the same risk of uterine rupture as a VBAC mom. And I would think that if he gave a stat like, everyone would have remembered because it is quite a remarkable statement as you will see shortly. While many women repeat, believe, and defend this statement, no one has supplied one study to me to support it.

Update 1/21/12 – Ruth S Beattie Dicken, the Speaker Chair of the 2011 ICAN conference contacted me via Facebook and said, ” Dr Macones did not say that. Nor did any other OB. I sat in on every session with OB speakers.”

Update 1/21/12: The difference in uterine rupture (UR) rates between unscarred, induced uteri and scarred uteri is significant: 2.2 per 10,000 in an unscarred, induced uterus and 64 in 10,000 in a scarred uterus. But it’s not that the risk of UR is so large in a scarred mom, it’s that it’s so very, very small in an unscarred mom, even when she is induced.

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OBs are often vilified (rightfully so) for giving women inflated rates of uterine rupture and I’ve documented several examples over the years: Another VBAC Consult Misinforms, Scare tactics vs. informed consent, Hospital VBAC turned CS due to constant scare tactics, and A father says, Why invite the risk of VBAC?. But the midwife (or OB, but it’s generally a midwife) who gives false information that minimizes the risk of rupture is just as harmful to the VBAC mom. Since I wrote Lightning strikes, shark bites, and uterine rupture, I’ve been making mental notes of other birth myths that seem to be forwarded from woman to woman, without anyone asking, “That’s a great statistic! What’s the source?”

There is one that I hear quite often:

A woman without a prior cesarean whose labor is induced is just as likely as a VBAC mom to experience an uterine rupture.

Recently, I heard it again and I really wanted to know if there was some study that demonstrated this. It’s a logical conclusion that inducing an uscarred woman would increase her risk of rupture as uterine rupture is listed as a risk for Pitocin and prostaglandins (such as Cytotec and Cervidil) but how much does induction increase the risk of uterine rupture in an unscarred uterus? And does the rate of rupture increase so much that it is the same as the risk of rupture in a VBAC mom? I had unsuccessfully looked for that information in the past, so I went to my Facebook page and asked if anyone had a source.

Several women responded who had heard this information, two of which from their midwives which is really frightening. Unfortunately, no one who responded could cite where they heard this information. So I started looking and found Uterine rupture in the Netherlands: a nationwide population-based cohort study (Zwart, 2009).

This study included 358,874 total deliveries, making it “the largest prospective report of uterine rupture in women without a previous cesarean in a Western country.” It also differentiates between uterine rupture and dehiscence which is really important because we want to measure the rate of complete rupture. You can read the study in its entirety here.

The role of induction in scarred and unscarred uterine rupture

Zwart utilized multiple methods of induction: cervical prostaglandins (sulproston, dinoproston, and misoprostol aka Cytotec), oxytocin (Pitocin) and mechanical dilatation. Prostaglandin “dosages ranged from 0.5 to 2.0 mg with a minimal interval of 4 h in between,” but they do not provide the dosages of the women who ruptured.

Of the 208 scarred and unscarred uterine ruptures, 130 (62.5%) occurred during spontaneous labor reflecting 72% of scarred ruptures and 56% of unscarred ruptures. 28 (13.5%) ruptures occurred during cervical prostaglandin induction. 22 (10.6%) ruptures occurred during oxytocin (Pitocin) induction.

It seems that there were women who were induced with prostaglandins and Pitocin as measured in Table 5. But there is no measure for women who ruptured and were induced with both prostaglandins and Pitocin in any of the uterine rupture tables.

There is no mention of Bishop’s score, but they did provide the “reasons for induction with prostaglandins [in scarred women which] included (nearly) post-term pregnancy (n = 10), intra uterine fetal death/ multiple congenital abnormalities (n = 5), elective (n = 3), pregnancy induced hypertension (n = 2), intra uterine growth restriction (n = 1) and prelabour rupture of membranes (n = 1).”

Interestingly, this Netherlands-based study found “there was a trend towards more liberal use of prostaglandins for induction of labour in low-volume hospitals as compared to middle- and high-volume hospitals (24.4% versus 13.0% of cases, P = 0.29).”

It’s also interesting that there were no maternal deaths even though “18 [unscarred] women (72%), rupture occurred outside office hours.”

The risk of uterine rupture in an induced labor without a prior cesarean

The study found, ” In 11 women [without a prior cesarean who experienced a uterine rupture], labour was induced, in all but one with prostaglandins.” Said in another way, 40% of the unscarred women who ruptured were induced with prostaglandins versus only 12.1% of scarred moms who ruptured.

So Zwart found that it’s not the Pitocin that causes the ruptures in unscarred moms, it’s the prostaglandins. This is logical because prostaglandins are harder to control. If the uterus is hyper-stimulating due to prostaglandins, they continue to work on the uterus even after they have been removed from the cervix. Pitocin, on the other hand, has a short half-life so the body responds quicker to the drip being turned off in the event of uterine hyper-stimulation.

While we know that there are 332,885 unscarred women included in this study, we don’t know the number or percentage of unscarred women who were induced. We need this information in order to calculate the rate of uterine rupture in induced, unscarred women.

So I did a little looking and I found Verhoeven (2009) which states ” In The Netherlands induction rates have remained stable over the last decades at approximately 15%.” Since the induction rate has been stable, and this study included 97% of births in The Netherlands between August 1, 2004 and August 1, 2006, I feel comfortable using this 15% rate of induction to calculate the rate of uterine rupture in induced, unscarred women.

So when we take 15% of the 332,885 unscarred women in the study, we get 49,933 induced, unscarred women.

Dividing the 11 ruptures that occurred in induced, unscarred women by 49,933 total induced, unscarred women, we get the following uterine rupture rate in induced, unscarred women: 0.022% or 2.2 per 10,000 deliveries.

Now let’s look at the rate of uterine rupture in women with a prior cesarean: “25,989 trials of labor were attempted in the Netherlands during the study [resulting in 183 ruptures.] The risk of uterine rupture would then be 0.64%” or 64 in 10,000 deliveries. This rate includes ruptures in induced and spontaneous labors, but we do know that 72% of those ruptures occurred during spontaneous labors.

In other words, a woman with a prior cesarean section has a uterine rupture risk 29 times greater than the risk of uterine rupture due to induction in a woman without a prior cesarean, 0.64% vs. 0.022%.

Another way to look at the data is: you would need to induce 4,546 women without a prior cesarean in order to get one uterine rupture due to induction.

While I hadn’t seen the numbers until now, I was always very skeptical when I heard this rumor. I’m glad to finally have hard numbers to share.

How does induction affect the rate of uterine rupture in an unscarred woman?

Next, since I had all the data available, I wanted to calculate how induction affects the rate of uterine rupture in an unscarred woman. Remember that 10 of the 11 ruptures in induced, unscarred women occurred during the use of prostaglandins and we don’t have information on the dosage in those labors.

We already established that the rate of rupture in an induced, unscarred labor was 0.022% or 2.2 per 10,000 deliveries.

The remaining 14 ruptures of the 25 total ruptures occurred during spontaneous labor.

14 spontaneous ruptures among 282,952 spontaneous labors in unscarred women, gives us a 0.0049% uterine rupture rate or .49 per 10,000 deliveries.

As I suspected, an unscarred woman induced with prostaglandins has a greater risk of uterine rupture than an unscarred woman in a spontaneous labor, but now we have exact figures: 0.022% vs. 0.0049%. Prostaglandin induction in an unscarred woman increases her risk of uterine rupture almost 5 times, but the overall risk is still extremely low.

Moving forward

It was interesting to note that among women with a prior cesarean, 72% of ruptures occurred during spontaneous labor. The scar itself, that prior cesarean surgery, is what increases the risk of uterine rupture the most. With this in mind, the researchers state:

With 29% of all previous caesareans being performed for breech presentation, we clearly show the negative side effects and long-term adverse consequences of routinely performing elective caesarean for breech delivery . . . the only means of reducing the incidence of uterine rupture is to minimise the number of inductions of labor and to closely monitor women with a uterine scar. . . Ultimately, the best prevention [of uterine rupture] is primary preventions, i.e. reducing the primary cesarean delivery rate. The obstetrician who decides to perform a caesarean has a joint responsibility for the late consequences of that decision, including uterine rupture.

This is why more hospitals offering breech vaginal birth and VBAC, such as Portland, OR based Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), is so important. Read more about OHSU’s mission to reduce the cesarean rate.

As I say in Myth: Risk of uterine rupture doesn’t change much after a cesarean:

While the risk of rupture in a spontaneous labor after one prior low transverse cesarean is comparable to other obstetrical emergencies, it is important for women weighting their post-cesarean birth options to know that their risk increased substantially due to their prior cesarean. It is important for them to understand the risks and benefits of VBAC vs. repeat cesarean. It is important for them to have access to accurate information and be able to differentiate between a midwife’s/blogger’s/doula’s/birth advocate’s/person on Facebook’s hopeful opinion vs. documented statistics.

I implore those who interact with, and have impact on, women weighing their birth options: do not pass along information, no matter how great it sounds, if you don’t have a well-designed scientific study supporting it. If you hear a statistic you would love to use and share, just ask the person who gave you this information,”What is the source?” and use the citation anytime you quote the statistic. But if the person doesn’t have a well-designed scientific study, be wary and don’t use the stat. This way, we can reduce the rumor and increase the amount of good information on the Internet. I know, a lofty goal.

I use the data in this same study to debunk the myth: the risk of uterine rupture is roughly double, or not much different, from an unscarred uterus. . . more dangerous information from what should be trusted sources.

Read more birth myths debunked including Lightning strikes, shark bites, and uterine rupture and Myth: Risk of uterine rupture doesn’t change much after a cesarean.

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Notes: This study found that there were 183 ruptures after a prior cesarean and states in the abstract that this reflects a rate of 0.051% or 5.1 per 10,000 deliveries. But the problem is, they divided the number of uterine ruptures after a cesarean by the total number of women (with a prior cesarean and without.) It’s only towards the end of the study do they state the risk of uterine rupture in a woman after a prior cesarean is 0.64%. So, this is a little confusing and is another example of why reading the entire study, rather than just the abstract, is so important.

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Verhoeven, C., Oudenaarden, A., Hermus, M., Porath, M. M., Oei, S. G., & Mol, B. (2009). Validation of models that predict Cesarean section after induction of labor. Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology, 34, pp. 316-321. Retrieved January 15, 2012, from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/uog.7315/pdf

Zwart, J. J., Richters, J. M., Ory, F., de Vries, J., Bloemenkamp, K., & van Roosmalen, J. (2009, July). Uterine rupture in the Netherlands: a nationwide population-based cohort study. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 116(8), pp. 1069-1080. Retrieved January 15, 2012, from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2009.02136.x/full

entirety

Hospital’s Oxytocin Protocol Change Sharply Reduces Emergency C-Section Deliveries

This article published June 19, 2009 demonstrates one hospital’s experience when they changed their oxytocin (Pitocin) protocol.

I’ve included the entire article below and have emphasized what I consider to be the most interesting parts.

Hospital’s Oxytocin Protocol Change Sharply Reduces Emergency C-Section Deliveries
By Betsy Bates
Elsevier Global Medical News
Conferences in Depth

CHICAGO (EGMN) – The modification of the oxytocin infusion protocol at a large university-affiliated community hospital nearly halved the number of emergency cesarean deliveries over a 3-year period, reported Dr. Gary Ventolini.

As oxytocin utilization declined from 93.3% to 78.9%, emergency cesarean deliveries decreased from 10.9% to 5.7%, Dr. Ventolini said at the annual meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Other birth outcomes improved as well at an 848-bed community hospital that serves as the primary teaching hospital of the Boonshoft School of Medicine at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio.

These included significant declines in emergency vacuum and forceps deliveries and a sharp reduction in neonatal ICU team mobilization for signs of fetal distress (P = .0001 in year 3 compared with year 1).

“More and more data are showing us that we are using too much oxytocin too often,” Dr. Ventolini, professor and chair of obstetrics and gynecology at the university, said in an interview.

“Our pivotal change was to modify the oxytocin infusion from 2 by 2 units every 20 minutes to 1 by 1 unit every 30 minutes. And we see the results,” he said.

Outcomes of 14,184 births from 2005, 2006, and 2007 were retrospectively analyzed to determine any impact of the change in an oxytocin protocol implemented in 2005. Patient characteristics were similar in all three calendar years.

The most profound changes were in emergency deliveries, including caesarean deliveries, vacuum deliveries (which dropped from 9.1% to 8.5%), and forceps deliveries (which fell from 4% to 2.3%).

The overall cesarean section rate remained unchanged, as did the rates of cord prolapse, preeclampsia, and abruption.

Dr. Ventolini cited a recent article in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology that suggests guidelines for oxytocin use, including avoidance of dose increases at intervals shorter than 30 minutes in most situations (Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. 2009;200:35.e1-.e6).

Dr. Ventolini and his associates reported no financial conflicts of interest relevant to the study.

Subject Codes:
womans_health;
Elsevier Global Medical News
http://www.imng.com

June 19, 2009   10:04 AM EDT

I’m pregnant and want a VBAC, what do I do?

I recently received this comment.

Hi…thank you so much for your site! Very informative. I live in Glendale and I had a c-section last year with my first daughter. I went in to be induced even though I wasn’t looking forward to it. No contractions. No mucus plug. No water broken. I guess I just wasn’t ready for labor yet. They hooked me up to an epidural because they said I was going to feel immense pain so I went with it. 26 hours went by and I never dilated so they gave me a c-section at citrus valley medical center. I saw them on your list for high c-section rate. Now, I am pregnant again (a year and a month later) I really want to have a VBAC! Any suggestions? I can see that you have touched many women…any information to spare would be awesome- Rose

Rose,

There are so many women who have experienced your exact story.  They trust their OB because, hey, they didn’t go to medical school, right?  So, here is your body, so obviously not ready to birth and yet we feel like if we force your body to birth by giving you drugs, somehow this will result in a normal labor.  Did your OB discuss the risks of induction?  How it increases the likelihood that you will need a cesarean either by the induction “not working” or your labor starting and then stopping or by the induction stressing the baby resulting in a “fetal distress” diagnosis?  I’m guessing no.  Let me make one suggestion.  If you want a VBAC, don’t go back to that OB and certainly don’t go back to Citrus Valley.  With a 28.7% primary cesarean rate, a 43.3% total cesarean rate, and a sad 1.5% VBAC rate, your chances of VBACing there are zero.  Put it another way: in 2006, there were 2105 cesareans and 17 VBACs there.  And I bet that if we knew your OB’s cesarean rate, it would probably be about the same as Citrus’ total cesarean rate.  So, you need a new care provider and a new location for your birth!  YOU CAN DO THIS!

So, first things, first.  Congratulations on your pregnancy! This is such an exciting time of your life!  But know that if you want a VBAC, this is not something that is just going to fall into your lap.  Especially if you want a hospital birth, you need to become informed, empowered, and ready for (a likely) battle.  If you pick a homebirth, you can relax a bit.  But more on that later.

Here are your marching orders!

1. Read. Rikki Lake’s My Best Birth is an excellent overview of birth.  Once you read that, if you are ready for more I recommend Ina May Gaskin’s Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth, Dr. Marsden Wagner’s Born in the USA, Henci’s Goer’s The Thinking Woman’s Guide, Jennifer Block’s Pushed, Tina Cassidy’s Birth in that order.  (While I want to give you all the great books I love, I also know that a lot of women only have time to read one or two.)

Please don’t waste your money or time on The Girlfriend’s Guide or What to Expect When You Are Expecting.  I’ve read them both and was so surprised that these are some of the top selling pregnancy books in the US.  They are dumb.  And lame.  And dumb.

Let me give you a recap of What to Expect: Can I take baths?  Can I exercise?  Can I have sex while pregnant?  Yes (not to hot), yes (not to strenuous), and yes (provided you have a normal pregnancy without a history of preterm labor.)

And The Girlfriend’s Guide?  Basically tells you to go to the hospital and get your epidural.  Oh, and your body is going to hell after a baby.  After I read that book, I was truly terrified of what my post-baby body would look like.

Seriously, skip them both.  There are so many great books to read, don’t waste your time on that dribble.  And yes, your boobs and butt will sag after having a baby, but at the end of your days, I don’t think you, or your children, will care one bit about your flabby boobs.

2. Home vs hospital. I had a homebirth, I had a good outcome and it was amazing.  You can read my birth story here: My HBAC Birth story.   But homebirth comes with real risks and even though the risk of uterine rupture is low, it does and will happen.  And in about 6% of uterine ruptures, the baby will die (Guise, 2010).  Chances are, you will be fine, but those statistics represent real moms and real babies.  With what we gain in homebirth (privacy, control, peace, limited pressure, etc), the primary thing that we lose is immediate access to surgical intervention.  You can read my extended thoughts on homebirth here: Why Homebirth.

So, read, think, reflect and decide what feels best. Of course, this also depends on your health and if you would qualify for a homebirth.

Someone suggested this to me when I was early pregnant with my VBAC son and I learned a lot: Imagine for a week that you are having a hospital birth. How do you feel? Are you nervous or at peace?  Are you excited or anxious?  Now do the same with  homebirth.

Other articles you might find interesting: Homebirth vs hospital birth for the number cruncher, OB lists reasons for rising cesarean rate, and Neonatal nurse has a homebirth VBAC.

2a. Hospital birth. If you chose to birth in a hospital, find the hospital with the highest VBAC rate.  Since you are in California, you can easily do this by going here: VBAC & Cesarean Rates of California Hospitals, 2007 and be sure to read Why if your hospital “allows” VBAC isn’t enough.

I think that if you want a hospital VBAC, your best bet is Kaiser.  Just looking at their 2006 California statistics, they had a 20.8% VBAC rate, a 15% primary cesarean rate and a 22.4% total cesarean rate.  Some Kaiser locations even permit CNMs (certified nurse midwives) to manage VBAC labors.  The national VBAC rate is 10% and in California it’s 9%, so 20% is excellent.

If you have a hospital birth and good insurance, you will likely save money in comparison to a homebirth (unless you have a PPO which may pay for some of your homebirth costs or you live in a state like Florida), but take that money you save and invest it in a doula.  I strongly recommend you have a doula if you have a hospital birth.  Labor requires concentration.  Dealing with medical professionals who may think you are a bit odd for wanting a VBAC requires concentration.  Your typical laboring woman does not have enough concentration and energy to deal with both things.  Read VBACing Against the Odds and Hospital VBAC turned CS due to constant scare tactics.

Hospitals vary greatly. Here is a wonderful birth story of a woman who VBACed at a Southern California Kaiser: The Birth Story of James Liam.

2b. Home birth. If you are at home, I think a doula is something you can get if you want, but skip if you don’t feel the need.  But this is really a personal preference.  At home, you have the freedom that you just don’t have at the hospital and you need not worry about hospital personnel trying to talk to you mid-contraction.

However, with homebirth you have other issues to attend to.  The most important thing when interviewing midwives is experience.  You need to know how many births she has attended and of those, how many was she the primary midwife (the responsible person at the birth as opposed to assisting a senior midwife.)  If you have an inexperienced midwife with limited informal or formal education, you are taking on additional risk that is really unnecessary.

Additionally, you want a midwife who has enough experience to know when to go to the hospital as well as the professionalism to interface, and even take crap from, hospital employees.  You and your baby’s well being should come well before her possible discomfort.  In states where it is illegal for a midwife to attend a OOH (out-of-hospital) VBAC, your midwife is not likely to present herself as your midwife if you transfer and this is understandable.

You also want to be aware of the birth myths that are sometimes propagated amongst midwives.  It is a massive red flag if your midwife repeats any of these myths to you.

I personally think that hiring a midwife who has experience and knowledge is more important than hiring one that you “click” with.  That really should come secondary to the ability to make quick decisions regarding your health as well as the health of your baby.

3. Find a provider. After you read The Three Types of Care Providers Amongst OBs and Midwives, Questions to Ask a Provider, Scare tactics vs. informed consent aka why I started this website, you can go to Finding a VBAC Supportive OB or Midwife and start using the resources listed there to find referrals for OBs or midwives.  I think the best way to find a care provider is through word of mouth.  I have heard many ‘bait & switch’ stories at 36 weeks. A provider says everything the mom wants to hear in the interview and then did a 180 once the woman was to far along in her pregnancy to expend the effort of finding another care provider.  It’s best to hear from multiple women, if possible, how a provider is during birth. 

4. Childbirth Education.  I think Bradley classes are great because you learn a ton.  The tone of a particular class can vary greatly depending on who is teaching it. I took the Hypnobabies Home Study course with my VBAC baby and I thought it was good, but it had a completely different emphasis.  I would also encourage you to find a “Truth About VBAC” workshop in your area.

Bradley had far more information about interventions, pros, cons, physiology and anatomy.  Hypnobabies was more about relaxation, visualization, positive thinking, calm, and peace.  My VBAC labor was very manageable until the last hour or so and I attribute that to maintaining a calm and peaceful state of mind, being in the peace of my own home, and, since I was drug-free and at home, having the freedom to move into the most comfortable position at the moment however and whenever I wanted.

There are many things that I enjoyed about Hypnobabies and if it’s possible, I would suggest doing both.  Hypnobabies is very clear that they don’t want you to take any other course and that they don’t want you to be exposed to the idea that childbirth is painful.  They even discuss pain like it’s a four letter word.  Pain doesn’t have to be negative though.

5. Finding support. 92% of women in the US have a repeat cesarean (Martin, 2009).  I personally believe this is due to misinformation, unsupportive medical professionals, a lack of social support, and hospital VBAC bans.  If you plan to VBAC, you are likely to come across many women who were lead to believe by their OBs that VBACs are to dangerous, illegal, or that “no one does them.” I know women in real life who knew one person who didn’t think they were complete whack-a-dos for planning a VBAC, and that person was me.

It can be hard and it can be isolating, but you can find support, you just need to know where to look.   Go back to the Finding a VBAC Supportive OB or Midwife list of resources and go to a couple La Leche League, ICAN, or Holistic Moms meetings.

And rest assured that even if you don’t know anyone in real life who supports your decision, you can find loads of support on-line.  Please don’t feel alone.  It can be so hard when you are so excited about your upcoming VBAC and the rest of the world is looking at you like you are crazy.  But you are not.

brothers-baby-siblings

AAFP National VBAC Guidelines

Update: In May 2014, the AAFP released new guidelines.

This is a great piece for deciding between VBAC and repeat cesarean.  Those who wish to VBAC, but have husbands, family, and/or friends who don’t understand why, might find this document very useful.

I have found that people who are anti-VBAC really seem impressed by what doctors and medical organizations have to say, so I’m thinking they will find this document compelling.

Plus, VBAC has this reputation of being “risky” and repeat cesareans are thought of as the “conservative approach,” and this document challenges both lines of thinking.

Why not write a sweet little note like, “I know you are concerned about me choosing the VBAC, so I thought you would find this interesting,” and mail them a copy.  That way, they can read it, think it over, and you can chat about it later.

No one wants to see a loved one hurt or die, and since most believe that a repeat cesarean is the most conservative approach, they tend to lean in that direction.  However, once they understand that real, but small, risks are present with VBAC and repeat cesarean, and that the risks of VBAC go down with each VBAC whereas the risks of cesareans go up with each surgery, hopefully they will respect your decision.

I recommend bringing this document with you when you go to interview OBs about VBAC.  They might be unfamiliar with the data, and they too might be persuaded by a document written by a medical organization.  If your OB is anti-VBAC, this might be a good document to mail them once you have found a truly supportive OB or midwife.

I’ve included the entire text below because when I searched on Google for VBAC vs. Repeat Cesarean, it wasn’t on the first page of results, so I’d like to bring more attention to it.

Please note, they refer to VBAC as TOLAC (Trial of Labor After Cesarean.)

You can view and print the document in PDF format here: Trial of Labor After Cesarean: A Shared Patient-Physician Decision Tool.

******************************************************************

In March 2005, the American Academy of
Family Physicians published an evidence based
clinical practice guideline on TOLAC
(Trial of Labor After Cesarean; formerly called
Trial of Labor Versus Elective Repeat Cesarean
Section for the Woman With a Previous
Cesarean Section).
The AAFP guideline
recommends offering a trial of labor to women
who have had one previous cesarean delivery
with a low transverse incision. The guideline
also recommends that physicians and other
maternity care professionals explore the risks
and benefits associated with a trial of labor with
each woman who is a candidate for TOLAC.
The following shared patient-physician decision
tool can be used to initiate the conversation
about the potential risks and benefits of TOLAC.
It is important to note that this piece is not
a patient education handout. It is not meant
to be used as a standalone tool. Physicians
should go through each section with the
TOLAC candidate and explain how each factor
may (or may not) affect her. After answering
any questions the patient may have, the
physician can give the annotated handout to
the patient so she and her partner can review
it as they consider their options.
To read the AAFP’s TOLAC Guideline, visit
http://www.aafp.org/tolac.

Patient name: ____________________________________________________
Physician: _______________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________

Trial of Labor After Cesarean:
Deciding What’s Right for You
and Your Baby

Women who have had a baby by cesarean section (C-section)
may have a choice about how to have their next
baby. They may choose to have another C-section. This
is called an “elective repeat cesarean delivery” (ERCD for
short). Or they may decide to try having the baby vaginally.
This is called a “trial of labor after cesarean” (TOLAC). When
a woman tries a trial of labor and is able to deliver vaginally,
this is called a “vaginal birth after cesarean” (VBAC).

If you’re reading this handout, it’s because your doctor
has decided that you have a choice between a planned
C-section and a trial of labor. To help you understand the
risks and benefits of each, you doctor will go through
this handout with you. He or she will explain how the
factors below apply to you. Be sure to ask your doctor any
questions you have. It’s important that you understand all
of the issues before you make a decision.

If I try labor, how likely am I to have my baby vaginally?
Because every situation is different, no one can tell if you
will be able to give birth vaginally. However, you should
know that about 76 out of 100 women who try a trial of
labor deliver their babies vaginally.

What happens to women who try labor but can’t
deliver vaginally?
Some women who try a trial of labor are not able to deliver
vaginally and end up having an unplanned C-section. You
should know that most of the babies born by unplanned
C-section are healthy and do not have long-term problems
from the C-section.

Is it is safer trying labor or having a planned C-section?
You already know that having a baby—whether vaginally or
by C-section—has some risks. The risks are generally small
whether you choose a trial of labor or planned C-section.
Studies have shown that there is no difference between
the two when it comes to the woman’s risk of death or
hysterectomy. There are, however, a few other risks to
consider. These are explained below.

Infection. Of women who choose a trial of labor,
7 out of 100 will get an infection. By comparison,
9 or 10 out of 100 women who choose planned
C-section will get an infection. This means that women
who choose C-section have a slightly higher risk of
infection (2% to 3% higher) than women who choose a trial
of labor.

Uterine rupture. A C-section leaves a scar on the
uterus. During a trial of labor, the scar can break open.
Usually this doesn’t affect you or the baby. In rare cases,
however, it can pose serious risks to you or your baby.
This is called symptomatic uterine rupture and it occurs
in 2.7 out of 1,000 women, or about ¼ of 1%, who try a
trial of labor.

Infant death. Sometimes—but not always—uterine rupture
results in the death of the baby. The chance of
this is about 15 in 100,000, or about 1/100th of 1%, in
women who try a trial of labor. There is no good data
about the risk of infant death for women who choose
elective repeat C-section.

What factors affect my chances of delivering
vaginally?
Doctors have studied thousands of women who have
attempted a trial of labor. They found that the following
factors affect a woman’s chance of delivering vaginally.
Your doctor will tell you how these factors apply to you.
You might want to ask your doctor to put a checkmark
next to the factors that may affect you and to cross out
the ones that probably won’t.

Factors that increase the likelihood of a
vaginal birth after C-section (VBAC)

• Being younger than 40 years old. If you’re under 40,
you are 2½ times more likely to have a VBAC.
My age: _________
Other notes: ________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________

• Having a vaginal birth before. If you’ve ever had a
baby vaginally, you’re more likely to be able to deliver
that way again.
I had a baby vaginally, but it was before I had a
C-section. You are 1½ to 2 times more likely to
deliver vaginally again.
I had a baby vaginally after I had a baby by
C-section. You are 3 to 8 times more likely to
have a VBAC.
Notes about your previous delivery or deliveries:
__________________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________
Other notes: ________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________

• Having favorable cervical factors during labor. This
means that your cervix is dilated (open) and effaced
(thinned out) enough to deliver vaginally. If you’re well
dilated and effaced, you are 1½ to 5 times more likely
to have a VBAC. If you’ve had a vaginal birth before,
your cervix may open and thin out more quickly than if
you haven’t. If you haven’t had a vaginal birth, it’s hard
to tell how well dilated and effaced your cervix will
become during labor.
I have had a previous vaginal birth.
Other notes: ________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________

• If the reason you needed a C-section before isn’t
a factor this time. You might have needed a
C-section because of infection, difficult labor, breech
presentation, or concerns about the baby’s size or
heart rate. If you don’t have the same problem this
time, you are 2 times more likely to have a VBAC.
Reason for my previous C-section: ______________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________
Other notes: ________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________
Factors that decrease the likelihood
of a VBAC

• Having had more than one C-section. If you have had
two or more C-sections, you’re 60% less likely to have
a VBAC.
Number of C-sections I’ve had: _________
Other notes: ________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________

 

• Going into labor after 40 weeks. After this time, you
are 20% to 30% less likely to have a VBAC.
My baby’s current gestational age: ________
My previous child(ren)’s gestational age(s) at birth:
__________________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________
Other notes: ________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________
__________________________________________

RISK OF SYMPTOMATIC UTERINE
RUPTURE IN ALL WOMEN
For all women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Less than 1 birth per 1,000
For women who have
not had a C-section . . . . . . . . . Less than 1 birth per 1,000
For women who have an
elective repeat C-section . . . . About 1 birth per 1,000
For women who have a trial
of labor after C-section . . . . . . 2 to 4 births per 1,000
(800) 274-2237 • www.aafp.org

• Trying to deliver a baby that is 8 pounds, 13 ounces
(4,000 grams) or larger. If your baby weighs this much
(or more), you are 40% less likely to have a VBAC.
My baby’s current estimated weight: ____________
My previous child(ren)’s weight(s) at birth: _______
Other notes: ________________________________
__________________________________________

• Using medicines to induce or augment labor. If you
need medicine to start or help your labor, you are 50%
less likely to have a VBAC.
Notes: _____________________________________
__________________________________________

What if I have other concerns?
In addition to thinking about your health and that of your
baby, you’re probably dealing with emotional issues
and practical concerns about the birth. Some common
concerns are listed below. When you read through this
list, you may want to put a checkmark next to the issues
you really care about and cross out those that aren’t
as important to you. Talk with your doctor about your
concerns. These issues haven’t been studied like the ones
above, but your doctor may be able to give you some
insight into how they might affect you.

Recovery time. If you deliver vaginally, you’ll probably
spend less time in the hospital and be back on your
feet more quickly. Some women think this is important
because they’ll be caring for the new baby and their older
children too.

Involvement in the delivery. For some women, having a
baby vaginally is more emotionally satisfying than having
a C-section. You get to hold your baby sooner, which
may help with bonding and even with breastfeeding. Your
partner may feel more involved in a vaginal birth too.

Future childbearing. Doctors typically don’t want women
to have more than two or three C-sections. So, you’re more
likely to be able to have more children if you have a vaginal
birth instead of another C-section.

Planned versus unplanned delivery date. Because
it’s better to go into labor on your own when you’re
planning a trial of labor, you probably won’t be able to
be induced. Not knowing when you will go into labor can
be stressful. It can also be a problem if you can’t arrange
for someone to watch your other child or children at a
moment’s notice. For these reasons, some women prefer
to plan on a C-section.

Pain during labor and delivery. If you had an especially
difficult and painful labor before, you may fear going
through it again. For this reason, some women prefer to
have another C-section and avoid labor. It’s important to
remember, though, that there are ways to manage the pain
if you decide on a trial of labor.

How do I make this choice?
You and your partner should work with your doctor to
decide whether the benefits of a trial of labor outweigh
the risks.

If you decide to try labor, you and your doctor will talk
about what to do if it looks like your labor is running into
complications. It’s best to have a plan before you begin your
labor so that you don’t have to make decisions during labor.
References

1. Wall E, Roberts R, Deutchman M, Hueston W, Atwood LA, Ireland B.
Trial of labor after cesarean (TOLAC), formerly trial of labor versus
elective repeat cesarean section for the woman with a previous
cesarean section. Leawood, Kan.: American Academy of Family
Physicians; March 2005.
2. Guise J-M, McDonagh M, Hashima J, Kraemer DF, Eden KB,
Berlin M, et al. Vaginal Birth After Cesarean (VBAC). Evidence
Report/Technology Assessment No. 71. Rockville, Md.: Agency for
Healthcare Research and Quality; March 2003. AHRQ Publication
No. 03-E018.
3. Gardeil F, Daly S, Turner MJ. Uterine rupture in pregnancy reviewed.
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 1994;56:107-10.
4. Miller DA, Goodwin TM, Gherman RB, Paul RH. Intrapartum rupture
of the unscarred uterus. Obstet Gynecol 1997;89:671-3.
5. Kieser KE, Baskett TF. A 10-year population based study of uterine
rupture. Obstet Gynecol 2002;100:749-53.

Should we blame women or doctors?

This post on a pregnancy message board under the subject “Inducing at 38 weeks” was the catalyst of a discussion on the ICAN email list (emphasis mine):

I’m for it! There is NOTHING wrong with me, actually not even THAT uncomfortable (knock on wood!), and my Dr. is inducing me at 38 1/2 weeks! The group induces all of their patients! He said by 38 weeks the baby is ready – so why not get them out in the real world! I know it’s REALLY because they are 3 men, who just don’t want to get called out in the middle of the night all of the time, but they wouldn’t do it if there was a risk! I think it’s becoming more common these days – I’m just so anxious to meet her, they can take her whenever they want!! I trust them, they did go to med school and have been in practice for YEARS!

Whose fault is it that this woman doesn’t think there is any risk to inducing at 38.5 weeks?  Is it her fault since she didn’t educate herself?  Or is it her OB’s fault that they didn’t inform their patient on the risks, benefits, and options of induction?  Is it unreasonable to blame the OB since prenatals with an OB are typically 3 minutes after an hour wait?  Or is it unreasonable to blame the patient since she hires the OB for their expertise and education?  But what about the fact that we are dealing with this patient’s health as well as her baby’s?  Isn’t the OB’s oath to first “do no harm?”  But shouldn’t the mom have a vested interest in her health and shouldn’t she care more about her outcome than her OB?  This is a complicated topic…

But, in case you are reading and wondering, “What’s the big deal?  What are the risks of induction?”  A quick google search of “induction risks” lists a ton of sites, here is a quick run down:

What You Should Know: Risks of Labor Induction

  • Contractions are more painful because you are forcing your body to contract with drugs
  • Poor positioning of the baby = longer/more painful labor
  • Longer labor because your body isn’t ready for labor
  • “Longer and stronger contractions can interrupt blood flow and oxygen to the fetus, which can lead to drops in the heart rate.”
  • More bleeding and infection
  • Longer hospital stay and/or longer length of recovery
  • Higher levels of NICU admissions
  • Hyperstimulation of your uterus
  • Premature separate of the placenta (placental abruption)
  • Uterine rupture
  • Increased risk of abnormal fetal heart rate, shoulder dystocia and other problems with the baby in labor.
  • Increased risk of your baby being admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).
  • Increased risk of forceps or vacuum extraction used for birth.
  • Increased risk of cesarean section.
  • Increased risks to the baby of prematurity and jaundice.

For a more complete discussion, and even more risks, please read Elective Induction of Labor by Henci Goer.  For a copy that you can easily print, go here.

I’m sharing with permission this post from the ICAN list that says there is plenty of blame to go around… (medpros = medical professionals)


I don’t think women exactly go out looking to hand the responsibility to
some one else. I think both women and doctors are to blame. Women think
(because no one tells them otherwise) that pregnancy has to be managed, that
they can’t do it on their own, and so they go on doing what they think they
are supposed to do, and right there waiting are the medpros waiting to offer
their “help”. Almost all women that walk into and Ob’s office think they are
doing the responsible thing. They think they ARE taking responsibility and
are getting the “care” they have been taught to get. The medpros gladly take
the responsibility from women more than I feel that women are looking to
hand it over.

It’s hard *because* women are not informed and they *don’t know* they are
missing information. They think they ARE informed. Once a person starts down
that path it’s hard to become truly informed because the new information
contradicts what they have always known AND it makes them feel like a fool
for not knowing before. I know we try to education women who just seem like
they don’t want to be educated, but it’s more than that. They have their
past decisions to protect. It’s not easy to realize you made mistakes. It’s
even harder when you made mistakes built on trust.

If women are failing we are failing each other more than we are failing our
individual selves. There is a reason there is such an emphasis on avoiding
that first cut. Women need to know BEFORE it’s too late, but those in “the
know” are not the majority and are certainly not the major influence on most
women today. Once you have been cut your further education is
forever limited by your experience and a women feels a need to rationalize,
justify, and remain in line with her former choices. (Some of us get past
it, many of us here, but we are a minority.) No one likes to hear that there
is a better way when they whole heartedly believed in the way they first
chose. It’d be like finding out you have been buying premium gas at a higher
price only to find out the cheaper gas is actually better for your
car. It would feel awful and your instinct would be to find a way that the
premium gas IS better so that you don’t feel as though you have wasted all
that money for nothing. However if when you get your first car some one
tells you the truth about what gas is best then you are just going to buy
the right gas and never make that mistake. And further more while you are
buying that premium gas and paying the higher price you might even brag to
your friends about how you can afford the better gas and how much better
your car is running, while there might be those around you thinking “you
idiot, that gas isn’t any better”, but NO one told you and if you are told
now, it’s too late, you’re invested. You might come around, but not everyone
would. Some people have to hold on to the bad decision they made being right
because if they admit they were wrong it would be devastating to them. Some
people can not handle that kind of truth or education. They have to remain
blind for their own sanity.

I know I learned nothing about pregnancy and birth from my mom. I know I
didn’t learn it from women I was friends with that were older than me and
had walked that path. I know I didn’t learn anything from my grandma or my
mother-in-law, or my sister-in-laws. What I learned was from movies and tv
where you go to an OB and they “help” you. Is it my fault that no one taught
me what I didn’t know I needed to know?

Sarah Taylor, New York